Cacher of the Month - June 2006

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  1. When did you start Geocaching?
  2. I found Bridgeview I, the closest cache to my house on July 24, 2003.

  3. How did you find out about Geocaching?
  4. I had seen it mentioned on a couple tech websites.

  5. What was it about geocaching that got you hooked into the game?
  6. Excuses. Namely, an excuse to get a new gadget, an excuse to get out, explore and exercise. That’s what got me started, what keeps me coming back are all the lovely experiences of being out alone discovering a new area or seeing something you’ve never seen before. As time progresses I’ve found more people to share the experiences with. Either people who I’ve dragged along or who are now interested themselves or other cachers I’ve met through the association or local events.

  7. Do you see this sport getting bogged down by rules and regulations in the future?
  8. I think as anything grows rules need to be tweaked a bit. I think it will change a little, but mostly for the good.

  9. Have you cached in any other provinces, countries?
  10. I’ve dotted cache finds from BC to Ontario and everywhere in between. In BC I took several family and friends caching on different days. In Ontario, one wet fall day, I pushed several travel bugs in the 2003 travel bug race into another province and one of them ended up grabbing 3rd prize.

  11. Have you ever introduced someone to geocaching? If so, who?
  12. Numerous friends, family and co-workers. None that picked up the sport themselves, but several request to go out caching regularly.

  13. What are other interests or hobbies that you have (please go into detail / accomplishments)?
  14. I don’t have much in terms of organized hobbies. I dabble in building electronics, amateur radio, volunteering for distributed.net and finding useful uses for consumer electronics like X10, TiVo, WWVB, 1-wire networks, etc.

  15. What are some things you don’t like about geocaching? What are your pet peeves?
  16. My biggest pet peeve is nature. I hate being out on a hot muggy summer day getting covered in dirt, dodging poison ivy and searching for wood ticks, all while trying to find the cache and avoid muggles.

  17. What is the most interesting/unusual place that geocaching has taken you?
  18. I don’t know that there is just one. It’s the fact that it takes you to that spot you drive by every day, but never really looked at closely, that park you never knew existed, or the corner of the park you had never visited, the town you never had a reason to visit, the road you never needed to drive down, the thing you’ve heard about but never knew where it was. Some of the caches that fit the bill: World Peace, Where Rivers Collide, Hulda Ostman, Ye Olde Hawk, Windy Acres and Mighty Morty.

  19. What is the most memorable cache that you have found (or tried to find?)?
  20. Hard to pick just one, but Lucky Tod (GCJFQ4) in Merritt, BC. My brother had picked it at random as one that we could grab quickly as we drove by. It turns out we drove about 6km off the highway and about 700m vertically up a narrow mining road now used for ranching. Then I proceeded to climb up the rock side of the mountain in the snow and found an old mine on a plateau. The cache was nearby.

  21. What is your most interesting item found in a cache?
  22. I’d have to say it’s the huge variety of travel bugs. They are the one thing I still regularly pick up in caches. From DNF-unlucky to cute little stuffed toys, to every odd variety of things, they are all very unique and often have interesting stories behind them.

  23. What items if any do you carry with you when you go on a hunt?
  24. My geocaching bag usually has the following in it: several trade items, any geocoins or travel bugs I currently have in my possession, a hat, extra ziplocks, lightweight hunting gloves MuStash left in a cache that I now use for searching pine trees, a flashlight, pens, wet naps, bandages, several sets of spare batteries, a notebook and my PDA. I’m always carrying my camera phone, but I might also carry my camera, million candlepower flashlight or a bottle of water if the required. I keep the car stocked with rubber boots, paper towels, more wet naps, more flashlights, maps (although I’ve never used them), first aid kit, air pump (I seem to pick up a large number of nails while caching) and the tunes.

  25. What kind of GPSr do you use?
  26. I have a Magellan Meridian Gold with Streets and Destinations Canada and alternatively, Directroute maps loaded. A Garmin 60Csx is getting awfully tempting though.

  27. What methods do you use to avoid muggle detection?
  28. Normally I just keep on walking. I try to be exactly sure of where the cache is before approaching. Having other people around helps to make you look like you fit it.

  29. What type/ size/ difficulty / Terrain do you prefer?
  30. Variety is a good thing so I like them all. I’m not a fan of really long hikes or multi-day trips, or wading through swamps.

  31. What was the most memorable travel bug that you have found?
  32. DNF-Unlucky (TBNE4W), Floyd's Spectrum (TBHNW3) and Perpendicular Migration (TB99C) have been memorable for me. Who can forget The Cache Eating Monster (TBKHHD).

  33. What would you like to see in the summer for as events go, type, styles, bbq's, car rallies?
  34. So far all the events have been interesting. I especially enjoy the events that have cache finding as a substantial part of the event such as the CITO event or Poker Derby. A balanced mix of caching and socializing is the best. Simpler smaller events, like Blitzing the Forks prove to be equally as enjoyable. Or just an ad hoc gathering of cachers.

  35. Which geocachers do you respect or standout to you the most?
  36. Since I end up being primarily a finder, I respect the hiders the most. I agonize over my caches forever, trying to make sure everything will work and that I haven’t forgot any of the details. How the prolific hiders such as the Queen can come up with ideas for so many caches, I don’t know.

  37. Who do you normally cache with?
  38. I’ll often cache with my friend Mike when he is available. I also like to go out for a cache outing with TurdleEggs or Lizardo. Actually, I’d invite anyone that wants to go caching to give me a shout. I always enjoy the company and having an extra finder on board is never a bad thing.

  39. What is your favorite time of year to cache? Least favorite?
  40. Each season has its pros and cons. Winter: 90% of the caches are impossible to find, the other 10% have tracks leading right to them. Although trudging through fresh snow takes quite the effort. Spring: Water hazards, but the weather is nicer, the foliage hasn’t grown yet and bugs and noxious plants aren’t an issue yet. Summer: Long nights and warm weather make almost every day suitable for caching, dodging noxious plants and bug hazards isn’t fun. Fall: Plants and bugs subside, but leaves become a real issue for finding caches.

Previous Cachers of the Month